Tashi Delek

A week in the beautiful kingdom of Bhutan


Thimphu Dzong

It’s shamefully embarrassing to admit this, but upon reflection I think I have reached the point where I’m travelling to countries that just a few years ago I knew little, or nothing about. My move to Bangladesh back in 2011 not only introduced me to this golden land, but given that my job is teaching students from 15 different countries, my eyes and ears have been exposed to each and every one of those countries in some way. I’m undoubtedly a lot richer for that.

A few weeks back I finally had the opportunity to visit one of those countries that had most intrigued me, and thanks to the assistance, amazing kindness and visa office doggedness of Dechen (a former student) I was on a plane to Paro and landing in Bhutan.

Bhutan is sandwiched in a somewhat intimidating position between India and China and is unique in its policy of measuring Gross National Happiness (GNH) rather than GDP. In effect, focus is placed more firmly upon the preservation of culture with a commitment to environmental conservation and sustainable development. Thus, it’s not the easiest of places to enter as a tourist or to roam freely once you are there. However, don’t let the bureaucracy deter you because quite frankly, it is stunning and so very endearing in many ways.

Punakha

In this account of my brief stay in Bhutan, I will try to explain just why, based of course on personal experience, this kingdom of just 800,000 people made such an impression.

Here is an album with a selection of photos – Bhutan


Natural beauty

Eastern Himalayan mountains, deep and dramatic valleys, winding rivers, dense forests, fertile pastures, and wide open plains all contribute to the breathtaking scenery that surrounds you. As the plane lands in Paro, it weaves between mountainous peaks and according to this article, only eight pilots are currently certified to land aircrafts there!

IMG_7533


Preservation of culture

Bhutan is proud of its cultural heritage, and has taken strong measures to ensure not only its survival, but crucially its conservation and continued significance in everyday life. Television and internet is a surprisingly new feature of life in Bhutan having only been introduced (officially) in 1999. Tourism is limited and controlled, and national dress is a must at various locations including most workplaces. There is a gritty commitment to rejecting and actively fighting those external influences that can commonly be accused of eroding traditional culture in certain other countries that have welcomed tourism with open arms.

Dechen, Pema, and Sonam in traditional dress

Dechen, Pema, and Sonam in traditional dress


Road safety signs

On the beautiful winding and meandering main highway between Paro and Thimphu, which I imagine is one of Bhutan’s busiest, there are regular road safety signs that predominantly focus on reducing speed. They get their message across though in a quirky and sometimes cheeky fashion. I wasn’t able to capture any photos, but I did make a note of two in particular that stuck in my head…

“If you are married, divorce speed!”

And…

“Be gentle on my curves”

On a more serious note though, it does appear that road safety is a huge priority in Bhutan with regular police checkpoints and from what I saw a diligent appreciation of the laws in place.


Dogs

In Bhutan there are dogs….so many dogs. They are everywhere. On every street corner, under every bridge, asleep on every sidewalk and at night they serenade you until the early hours with huge canine choirs. They are also quite often big, furry things that generally add a level of happiness and warmth to an already happy and warm country!


There are bins. People use them.

There seems to be a genuine commitment to, and pride in keeping the country clean. It may seem a little patronizing to point this out, but from travelling and from experiences back home in the UK, I feel that many places (and people) have abandoned their responsibility to this simple and basic condition. The bins are also covered in motivational and encouraging messages, just in case you feel the inclination not to utilize them.


Hospitality

This was not much of a surprise. Whenever I travel I encounter genuinely kind and hospitable people. Bhutan was no different, and I had not expected it to be. Before I’d even begun the visa application process, my Bhutanese students and their families had offered all kinds of help and support, and once I landed in Bhutan that help and support became even more ubiquitous. From the man in the coffee shop who gave me a warm welcome each morning, to the friend of a friend who within thirty minutes of meeting me had paid for my dinner, it was a week full of unrelenting kindness. Special mentions must go to Dechen, Pema, Sonam, Yeshey, Kencho, Namgay, and to Roma and her family. These wonderful people made my stay in Bhutan even more perfect than it could have been.

Pema, Dechen and Sonam

Roma with some local kids

Namgay – my new friend and fantastic guide for a day in Punakha

Dechen and Pema


Beautiful Buildings

In Bhutan it seems there are beautiful old buildings everywhere. In Thimphu many of the newer buildings also display the traditional style, which goes a long way to once again preserving the history and cultural heritage.


So, those are just a few aspects of my trip to Bhutan that stood out and made we wish I’d had significantly more time to really explore further. As with many of the places I’ve visited, I plan to return one day. I’m not sure when that will be, but hopefully sooner rather than later.

Oh, and in case you’re wondering, Tashi Delek is difficult to translate directly, but it is often taken to mean “blessings and good luck” and is used in Bhutan, but also parts of Nepal and northern India.

Here is a gallery of some further photos from my trip…

7 responses

  1. lewice

    Glad to see another blog post John. I’ve always said you write well, but I was never quite sure what made your articles so readable, then today it struck me – your writing is completely devoid of arrogance or ego.

    December 19, 2015 at 3:17 pm

  2. rome

    Well! Mr. John, we are very pleased to understand the reasons for your love to our country. And in this manner I have no better words , better than thanking you for having appreciating Bhutan. You are a wonderful person too and being such a positive person I’m sure you have that coloured mind to recognize the colours of the beauty of this world.
    Nothing but not the least, keep travelling and will be happy to see that happiness by envying the beauty of this world… if by chance, would love to travel the world along with you who has such a colourful mind.
    It was good to meet you here. ❤

    December 19, 2015 at 3:32 pm

  3. Dad

    Another interesting and colourful blog John. Bhutan certainly made an impression and the photos go a long way to see why.

    December 19, 2015 at 5:39 pm

  4. Peter Perrett

    Most interesting John. Are you home for Christmas?

    December 20, 2015 at 7:42 am

  5. Jane Brokaw Eve

    Gorgeous pictures! This piece makes me want to go to Bhutan

    December 20, 2015 at 11:55 am

  6. Uncle Robbie

    Another fascinating incite into a culture and people that have obviously made an impression on you. We look forward to seeing you over the festive period to learn more about your experiences and what you are planning in the future.

    December 21, 2015 at 8:54 am

  7. Mum xx

    Another brilliant blog John. It sounds like a wonderful place to visit ….. clean, colourful and plenty of dogs! Beautiful photos. Hope you get to visit there again or maybe work there?

    December 22, 2015 at 6:34 pm

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