In the full blossomed paddy fields…


Sandwip

Pronounced ‘Shon-deep’ (or Shun-deef depending on who you talk to) the island of Sandwip sits at an estuary of the Meghna River on the Bay of Bengal. Open precariously to the elements, the residents of the island are no strangers to the carnage and chaos extreme weather can bring. On April 29, 1991 it is estimated that 40,000 people were killed by an unforgiving cyclone that tore through the island leaving thousands dead and even more homeless.

Sandwip

Almost 23 years on from that day, the island was a perfect picture of calm and serenity when I visited last week to spend a couple of days with a colleague who was born and raised on Sandwip, and whose family still reside there. The memories of that fateful day in 1991 still haunt people though, and as my colleague introduced me to one family member the immediate response was to enquire somewhat confusedly as to why I had come, and was I not scared of the threat of a cyclone? The fear still grips residents of this community and as water levels rise, shores slowly creep towards homes, and extreme weather becomes even more unpredictable, it’s easy to understand why.

Sandwip

However, apart from one short, sharp thunder storm my visit was largely undramatic in terms of weather. The rumbles of thunder and the patter of raindrops on the tin roofs only added to the charm of this place. You see Sandwip proved to be an experience of some contrast to my regular, everyday experience of Bangladesh. In Chittagong (my home for the entire two year duration of my life here so far) the noise of trucks, buses, cars, and CNGs penetrates and pollutes the air almost everywhere you go. It’s a city of 6 million people and thus it is hard to find a place to escape that hustle. I appreciate Chittagong for so many reasons, but the noise can take its toll at times.

Sandwip

When I returned from Sandwip I told a friend quite proudly and perhaps even a little smugly that I had seen only one lone car during my time on the island. His response was to point out that I had in fact been rather unfortunate as most visitors don’t see any!

Without wanting to sound patronising or to belittle Sandwip in any way, I would sum up my time there as taking a step back in time. I mean this in the most positive way. At night the stars filled the sky and were as bright as I’d ever seen them. In the day the local market bustled with traders and large numbers of cattle ready to be sold.

Agriculture drives the local economy it seems and manual labour appears to be the catalyst for this. There are countless tea shops, and each and every one seemed to be the centre of discussion and socialising amongst the islanders.

Sandwip

There are few roads on Sandwip. In more developed areas paved paths allow bicycles and rickshaws to pass easily, and if you go ‘off road’ you will find more basic, dusty paths that make it more complex for anything on wheels to pass. Bathing is also a distinctly communal affair for many.

I bathed in the pond close to the house where I was staying. This essentially entailed tying a lunghi around my waist and diving into the pond. It all went fine until I dropped the soap and it sank beneath the murky water, causing much amusement to the onlookers who had gathered to watch me bathe. Sandwip does not receive a vast number of foreign visitors, so my half naked presence in the pond drew a crowd!

Sandwip

Life is visibly tough though for many people here, and it was evident everywhere I visited on the island. Manual labour dominates as I mentioned, and this comes in a variety of forms. For example, as we left the island to return to the urban sprawl of Chittagong, we had to board a speedboat. At the time we and around ten other people wished to travel, the tide was out and thus the channel sat far out in the distance, and before us lay a mass of deep, dense, and unsympathetic wet sand. The solution was to herd us into a nearby wooden boat, and it soon became apparent that 10 men would drag us out to where the speedboat was waiting.

For the next 25 minutes they heaved and used every muscle in their bodies to get us to the water. When the boat became trapped assigned men would leap into action and strategically dig away the offending sand and we’d continue on our way. At some points they would chant in unison to motivate each other and it was apparent that teamwork was paramount. We arrived at the speedboat and 25 minutes later we were back on mainland Bangladesh. Well, not quite. The process was repeated and once again we were dragged across the sand. By the end I felt incredibly lucky to be able to teach.

Sandwip

My time in Sandwip was short, but I caught a glimpse of something I felt it was possible for me to connect with. Of course life on the island is very different to my previous personal life experiences, but there is something about rural Bangladesh which intrigues me. The people were so welcoming and despite my still very limited Bangla skills, I was able to converse and bond with a number of people. My colleague and his family were the perfect hosts and I am already planning on when I can return for a longer visit.

For my full album of photos from Sandwip follow the link below;

Sandwip photo gallery

Sandwip

Finally, the title of this blog post is the English translation of a lyric from the national anthem of Bangladesh, Amar Sonar Bangla, by Rabrindranath Tagore. Today marks Bangladesh’s 43rd year of independence. Here is a wonderful rendition of the song,

Amar Sonar Bangla

8 responses

  1. Dad

    As usual John, a very interesting blog and some great photos. well done !

    March 27, 2014 at 8:18 am

  2. James O'Connor

    Very interesting reading John , great pictures and beautiful music .Well done and thank you .
    Grandad

    March 27, 2014 at 10:58 am

  3. iceman

    As always I enjoyed travelling through your words. Sounds a great place, almost as sleepy as Torquay isn’t it?
    One small criticism, “estimated that 40,000 people were killed by an unforgiving cyclone that tore through the island leaving thousands dead and even more homeless”, you say estimated 40,000 killed, then leaving thousands dead, not very well written, and you usually write very well.
    Keep you article coming, I enjoy criticizing them almost as much as reading them. Hope you are well. Rich 🙂

    March 27, 2014 at 4:21 pm

    • Good point mate – I’ll edit that, not the best writing as you say. Thanks for reading still and for the feedback 🙂

      March 28, 2014 at 3:50 am

  4. Robbie

    You really bring to life your blogs with the fantastic photos of the subject! I am envious of your travels and being able to see how people in other countries really live! I am already looking forward to the next episode!!

    March 27, 2014 at 4:21 pm

  5. iceman

    Just read the comments from your Dad and your Grandfather, it is nice that your family are proud of all your adventures and the way you record it. You must have the backbone of an interesting biography by now!

    March 27, 2014 at 4:31 pm

  6. Mum

    As always John, a very interesting and well written blog. Enjoyed the photos and the music video. I can understand how well you appreciated the peace and quiet compared to the hustle and bustle of Chittagong. The bathing sounded interesting! Look forward to your next blog. xx

    March 30, 2014 at 6:44 am

  7. Jane

    beautifully written and amazing pix. xoxo

    March 30, 2014 at 12:59 pm

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